Seabird die-offs in Iceland

15 07 2014

Though the United States stretches across a continent between two oceans, when it comes to seabirds, we here on the east coast have a great deal more in common with our neighbors in Europe, Iceland, and Greenland than we do with our Pacific compatriots. For this reason, we always keep an eye on the goings-on in our ocean nation, as well as our political nation. Right now, there is an investigation underway into die-offs of Common Eiders, cormorants, and Black-legged Kittiwakes in Iceland. Wildlife officials have collected carcasses and submitted them for examination to the National Wildlife Health Center in the U.S. and to the University of Iceland’s Snaefellsnes Research Centre and The Institute for Experimental Pathology at Keldur, as well as the West-Iceland Centre of Natural History.

The die-offs occurred on the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland.

The die-offs occurred on the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland.

Of course, when we here in the Northeastern United States think of eider die-offs, we immediately think of Wellfleet Bay Virus (WFBV), but other potential causes have been suggested. Avian botulism, caused by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, has not previously caused die-offs in Iceland, but will undoubtedly be on the list of potential diagnoses, as it always is in the face of mass bird deaths. The tally appears to be around 100 birds so far, across the multiple species. The kittiwakes were found several miles from the site where the eiders were discovered, but that does not rule out a common cause for the mortalities. There is not much common ground between eiders and kittiwakes in terms of how they make their livings, except that they both utilize fresh water pools for bathing and drinking. Freshwater ponds and lakes are generally the source of botulism outbreaks, so that may be the grounds for suggesting botulism as a potential cause. Previous eider die-offs elsewhere have been put down to infections with a kidney parasite called coccidia.

It’s always welcome news that a die-off is being investigated, and we look forward to hearing the results from this event as soon as they become available.

 

Now, in a nonsensical and completely unrelated department, I give you this link to coverage of “The Blob of Provincetown” in Massachusetts.

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